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Wednesday, July 22, 2020 | History

2 edition of Ojibwa Indians of Parry Island, Their Social and Religious Life. found in the catalog.

Ojibwa Indians of Parry Island, Their Social and Religious Life.

National Museum of Canada.

Ojibwa Indians of Parry Island, Their Social and Religious Life.

by National Museum of Canada.

  • 104 Want to read
  • 20 Currently reading

Published by s.n in S.l .
Written in English


Edition Notes

1

SeriesBulletin (National Museum of Canada) -- 78, National Museum of Canada. Anthropological series -- 17
ContributionsJenness, Diamond.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL21887426M

See, for instance, Diamond Jenness, The Ojibwa lndians of Parry Island: Their Social and Religious Life, National Museums of Canada Bulletin 78 (Ottawa, ON, ) for a discussion of wabenos; Walter J. Hoffman, "The Midewiwin or 'Grand Medicine Society' of the Ojibwa," Annual Report of the Bureau of American Ethnology, no. 7 (Washington, DC. The book Ojibway Ceremonies came about in the following way.. As guest editor of Tawow, a magazine devoted to Native issues and themes and published in Ottawa, Canada, I met Ernest Willey, a Kwakiutl Indian, then residing in Toronto, Ontario, while I was scouting for writers for my projected theme, Native World Views.. After hearing Mr. Willey speak on his tribe to an audience at the Canadian.

(Jenness, Diamond, , The Ojibwa Indians of Parry Island, Their Social and Religious Life, National Museums of Canada Bulletin #78, Anthropological Series #17, pages ) Ojibwa . (Jenness, Diamond, , The Ojibwa Indians of Parry Island, Their Social and Religious Life, National Museums of Canada Bulletin #78, Anthropological Series #17, pages 17) Ojibwa .

Ojibwa have also seen their sacred religious beliefs, such as vision quests, misinterpreted and sold by seekers of New Age thought. Misconceptions about sovereignty are common. Almost all early treaties promised the Ojibwa that they could continue to hunt and fish in ceded land. Religion and Ceremonies of the Lenape, Indian Notes and Monographs [Series]. New York: Museum of the American Indian. Jenness, Diamond The Ojibwa Indians of Parry Island, Their Social and Religious Life. (Bulletin No. 78, Anthropological Series No. 17), Canada Department of Mines, National Museum of Canada, Ottawa: J.O. Patenaude, I.S.


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Ojibwa Indians of Parry Island, Their Social and Religious Life by National Museum of Canada. Download PDF EPUB FB2

Beliefs regarding man, nature, and the supernatural, and their importance in the social and religious life of the Parry Island Ojibwa are given special attention in this work by Jenness.

The author uses the myths and legends of the people to explain and supplement these beliefs, and also quotes directly to a great extent from informants. An Appendix at the end of the book brings together. Get this from a library. The Ojibwa Indians of Parry Island: their social and religious life.

[Diamond Jenness]. The Ojibwa Indians of Parry Ojibwa Indians of Parry Island, Their Social and Religious Life [Jenness, Diamond] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

The Ojibwa Indians of Parry Island, Their Social and Religious Life. The Ojibwa Indians of Parry Island: their social and religious life. Author Jenness, Diamond, Title The Ojibwa Indians of Parry Island: their social and religious life / by Diamond Jenness.

Format Book Published Ottawa: J.O. Patenaude, printer, Description vi, p. ; 25 cm. The Ojibwa Indians of Parry Island by Diamond Jenness; 4 editions; First published in ; Subjects: Ojibwa Indians, Indians of North America, Canada, Parry island; Places: Northwest Territories, Parry Islands, Parry Island.

So does Diamond Jenness' () study of the Ojibwa of Parry Island found in The Ojibwa Indians of Parry Island, Their Social and Religious Life.

The findings of the present study are largely in agreement with those of Densmore and of Jenness regarding child life. The Ojibwa Indians of Parry Island, their social and religious life / by Diamond Jenness. E 99 C6 J45 My apprenticeship with a modern Ojibwa shaman: a personal and comparative analysis of shamanic flight / Marilyn E.

Johnson. The Ojibwe, Ojibwa, Chippewa, or Saulteaux are an Anishinaabe people of Canada and the northern Midwestern United are one of the most numerous indigenous peoples north of the Rio Canada, they are the second-largest First Nations population, surpassed only by the the United States, they have the fifth-largest population among Native American peoples, surpassed in.

Jenness, D. The Ojibwa Indians of Parry Island. Their social and religious life. Bulletin of the Canada Department of Mines Ottawa: National Museum of Canada. The Ojibwe welcomed them into their communities, seeing them as agents of alliance with the Europeans, while the ABCFM saw their role as straight-up converting the people to Christianity.

The misunderstanding was definitely a mixed blessing, but it did supply the Ojibwe with information about European plans and lifestyles, even if it led to.

The Ojibwa Indians of Parry Island [microform]: their social and religious life / by Diamond Jenness. Format Microfiche Book Published Ottawa: J.O. Patenaude, Description vi, p.

; 25 cm. Uniform series Bulletin (National Museum of Canada) ; no. Bulletin (National Museum of Canada). TY - BOOK AU - Jenness, D. PY - DA - // TI - The Ojibwa Indians of Parry Island: Their Social and Religious Life T3 - National Museums of Canada Bulletin IS - 78 PB - Canada Department of Mines and Resources CY - Ottawa N1 - Jenness () ID - jenness ER.

Originally published in by the Smithsonian Institution Bureau of American Ethnology as Bulletin Here, Hilger references Diamond Jenness, The Ojibway Indians of Parry Island, their social and religious life. Nat. Mus. Canada Bull. 78, Anthrop. Ser. 17 (). Francis Pegahmagabow, an Ojibwa from Parry Island, is the most deco­ rated Aboriginal soldier of the World Wars.

After he returned home from World War I, he acted as chief informant of government anthropologist Diamond Jenness, in the latter's writing of his important work: The Ojibwa ofParry Island, Their Social andReligious Life (). Their main building material, wiigwaas (birch bark), could be transported anywhere to make a wiigiwam (lodge shelter).

Social organization was somewhat egalitarian, and women played a strong economic role. Source: Unknown. Ojibwe Indians in a maple syrup camp The manufacture of sugar was one of the principal Indian industries. The Ojibwa Indians of Parry Island, their social and religious life.

The Ojibwa Indians of Parry Island, their social and religious life. National Museum of Canada Anthropological Series. The Ojibwa Indians of Parry Island, Their Social and Religious Life. (Bulletin No. 78, Anthropological Series No. 17), Canada Department of Mines, National Museum of Canada, Ottawa: J.O.

Patenaude, I.S.O., printer); [Facsimile Reprint, Coyote Press]. Paperback The Ojibwa Indians of Parry Island, Their Social and Religious Life (Bulletin No. 17). Click on the article title to read more. Like other Algonkian-speaking groups, the Ojibwa traditionally sought personal relations with guardian spirits whom they encountered in visions, as a rite of passage into status as adults.

Visions were sometimes sought as early as age three or four, and were generally accomplished no later than puberty. The procedures for cultivating visions blended practical and ritual elements. JENNESS, DiamondThe Ojibwa Indians of Parry Island, their Social and Religious Life.

National Museum of Canada, Ottawa. JOHNSTON, BasilOjibway Language Lexicon. Affaires indiennes et du Nord canadien, Ottawa.Diamond Jenness has 18 books on Goodreads with ratings.

Diamond Jenness’s most popular book is Indians of Canada.The dream dance of the Chippewa and Menominee Indians of northern Wisconsin Benton-Banai, Edward, The Mishomis book: the voice of the Ojibway Bishop, Charles A. The Ojibwa Indians of Parry Island, their social and religious life E1.